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Imitating maestro’s style
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By MOHAN NADKARNI The Economic Times, May 21, 1989 Anant Terdal, a Belgaum-based vocalist, provided an utterly pleasant evening, at the NCPA’s Little Theatre, on May 15. By all accounts, it was his debut in the city. Undeterred by poor audience attendance – which, incidentally, has been an unnerving feature of most classical performances sponsored by NCPA at the mini-auditorium – the artiste got...

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New star on classical horizon
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By MOHAN NADKARNI The Economic Times, July 9, 1989 At a time when lighter forms like ghazal, geet and bhajan continue to carry popularity and glamour among the elige, and youngsters are driven by the temptation to meet “popular” demand, one also comes to witness a ray of hope amid the apparently bleak prospect on the classical music scene. Over the last five years,...

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New dimension to “Gharana” ideology
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By MOHAN NADKARNI The Economic Times, May 8, 1988 Last week’s presentation by Professor V. R. Athavale on “Gharanas in Hindustani Music” came like a breath of fresh air. It is just as well that the presentation drew a discerning audience which comprised a large proportion of performing artistes, researchers, scholars and critics. The presence of serious connoisseurs among the audience was a heart-warming...

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A Great Evangelist: Book Review
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By MOHAN NADKARNI The Times of India, July 2, 1972 PANDIT VISHNU DIGAMBER PALUSKAR (1871-1931) was the first musician to bring traditional Indian music to the masses- the music that had long remained the exclusive preserve of the rich. This he did in the true tradition of a missionary. He undertook extensive tours and started jalsas (public concerts) for the rank and file. He...

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Music for the Masses
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By MOHAN NADKARNI writing as GURUDEV SHARAN Times Weekly, February 6, 1972 Vishnu Paluskar, whose birth centenary was celebrated yesterday, was the first to rescue traditional music from the bonds of state and private patronage. INDIAN music has a fine record of development over the centuries. But the extent of neglect it suffered under British rule was truly appalling. This period marked the gradual...

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Glimpses of Aman Ali’s vocalism
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By MOHAN NADKARNI The Economic Times, January 8, 1989 The vocalism, known as the Bhendi Bazar gharana, was conceived and shaped by the late Indore maestro, Aman Ali Khan. The style is distinct and different from the several contemporary khayal styles in many respects. First, it is known for its high-degree rhythm play. Secondly, the voice production is marked by delicacy and bewitching inflections....

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